Confessions_of_a_MICHAEL_STIPE

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:::THIS IS ACTUAL ME. ::: also from 2009 WWW.MICHAELSTIPE.COM... from 2007 WWW.FUTUREPICENTER.COM... and WWW.REMHQ.COM. that's it for me, i am NOWHERE else online...don't believe the fakes. thx! MICHAEL xxx

2014
cavetocanvas:

Joseph Beuys, Untitled, 1984
From the Guggenheim:

The vitrine Untitled (1984) contains Encounter with Beuys (1984), which consists of felt, fat, copper pieces, and cord, the materials he used repeatedly to describe significant events in his life. The first two materials refer to the pivotal incident in his biography, an alleged wartime plane crash in which mountain people saved his life by wrapping him in felt and fat; copper was used by Beuys to represent spiritual conduction, while cord as a readymade has fascinated artists from Piero Manzoni to Dorothea Rockburne. The placement of autobiographical objects in a vitrine relates particularly to his major 1985 exhibition in Naples, where he installed a series of golden plates and vitrines, suggesting the burial hall of a king. Beuys favored the vitrine for its ready association to ethnographic installations. As part of his fusion of rituals and their fetishes, he believed that art and artifacts could not always be distinguished from one another.

cavetocanvas:

Joseph Beuys, Untitled, 1984

From the Guggenheim:

The vitrine Untitled (1984) contains Encounter with Beuys (1984), which consists of felt, fat, copper pieces, and cord, the materials he used repeatedly to describe significant events in his life. The first two materials refer to the pivotal incident in his biography, an alleged wartime plane crash in which mountain people saved his life by wrapping him in felt and fat; copper was used by Beuys to represent spiritual conduction, while cord as a readymade has fascinated artists from Piero Manzoni to Dorothea Rockburne. The placement of autobiographical objects in a vitrine relates particularly to his major 1985 exhibition in Naples, where he installed a series of golden plates and vitrines, suggesting the burial hall of a king. Beuys favored the vitrine for its ready association to ethnographic installations. As part of his fusion of rituals and their fetishes, he believed that art and artifacts could not always be distinguished from one another.



38 notes
  1. juliusnielsen reblogged this from cavetocanvas and added:
    Joseph Beuys, Untitled, 1984
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  4. celestiteblue reblogged this from confessionsofamichaelstipe and added:
    How can I have so much in common with an artist conceptually, and so little in common aesthetically?
  5. aubergeen reblogged this from confessionsofamichaelstipe
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  8. 20thcenturypix reblogged this from cavetocanvas and added:
    1984
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